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Alec Morton

Professor

United Kingdom
Professor, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow

Biography

Alec Morton has degrees from the University of Manchester and the University of Strathclyde. He has worked for Singapore Airlines, the National University of Singapore, and the London School of Economics, has held visiting positions at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Aalto University in Helsinki, and the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Hefei, and has been on secondment at the National Audit Office. His main interests are in decision analysis and health economics, and he is one of the developers of the STAR toolkit sponsored by the Health Foundation.  He is a member of the International Decision Support Initiative and the Health Service Research Center of USTC.

Alec has been active in the INFORMS Decision Analysis Society and the OR Society. He is on the Editorial Board of Decision Analysis and is an Associate Editor for the EURO Journal on Decision Processes, the Transactions of the Institute of Industrial Engineers, and OR Spectrum. Past consulting clients include the National Audit Office, the Department of Health, the Environment Agency, the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis & Malaria. His papers have won awards from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research and the Society for Risk Analysis.  His book Portfolio Decision Analysis with Jeff Keisler and Ahti Salo won the INFORMS Decision Analysis Society publication award in 2013 and his paper "CUT: A Multicriteria Approach for Concavifiable Preferences" (with Nikos Argyris and Jose Figueira) was a finalist for the same prize in 2016 .


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CV_Alec Morton

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1 related question found.

Sample for utility

In terms of number of respondents required for utility data, is there any standardized formula to calculate? And whether it is justifiable to calculate using proportion estimation? In case of the limited sample (e.g. rare disease, low survival rate) and do not meet the expected sample (as calculat...

Asked: 12 Apr 2018  |   7 views  |   1 answer